Newsletters - YCBA South Carolina
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Newsletters

February 2020

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ninC9A0AxxtgMV7YRwbntxcMhW9kJGn3GrufvwqrxDc/edit?usp=sharing_eip&ts=5e4a67f5

What’s up in the hives this month?

The queen  remains in the cluster and as the days become milder she begins to lay more eggs. The protein stores or (pollen patty) is used to feed young larva. These bees will hatch out of the cell in 21 days. When young bees are being raised and days are warm the bees will consume more food. At this time, the cluster will begin to grow in size. A varroa mite and foulbrood inspection should be done and a proper evaluation of “queen activity”. By mid February, you should see bees carrying natural pollen into the hive. When this occurs, the queen will also begin to lay drone eggs (unfertile eggs). These drones will hatch in 24 days.

      • Check food stores (pollen and honey)
      • Treat for varroa mites or foulbrood if needed
      • Begin a “bloom calendar” to document pollen and nectar
      • Attend bee meeting
      • Assemble equipment
      • Order queens
      • Pay state and local dues – Dues Past Due! $10 state (SCBA) and $20 local (YCBA)
        Please do not pay SCBA dues directly to the association but instead pay to YCBA so we have a record of your payment

Replace old or tired bee equipment – order from our own co-op, it’s economical and William will be happy to help you. It will help to get you through the dark, cold winter. Reach out to Roger Dye until further notice at: rogerdye@comporium.net  Normally William Copeland at:  williamcopelandjr50@gmail.com 

 

Bee School

Feb 20th – April 2nd. Please help spread the word and post the attached flyer wherever you can. The cost is $90 and includes all materials. YCBA2020Flyer

 

Bee Packages

Packages will Arrive April 11th and are $95 each. Queens are $25 and Marked Queens are $30. Get your orders in soon as packages are limited. YCBA Package Bees 2

 

YCBA Meetings

2nd Thursdays of each month at 6:30 pm.  Bullock Creek Church, 1188 Edgefield Rd, York, SC 29745
Mark Sweatman, a Master Beekeeper, was our February speaker. Mark recommended 3 books and provided 3 pdf’s.

 

Words of Wisdom from our speaker last month, James Alverson:

Things to think about. What are your bee goals?

      • Keep bees alive, maximize hive, make nuts, raise some queens? Your goals will determine your management.
      • Beekeeping is personal and local, keep a bloom calendar
      • Feeding 1:1 sugar syrup, fondant
      • Feb-March above 60 degrees look to see if bees have honey, don’t build up bees too quickly
      • Check out honey bee health coalition  https://honeybeehealthcoalition.org/
      • Check for mites; keep mite count down less than 1 per 100
      • Treat 3 times in spring before putting on honey supers

Here’s the link to check out an oxalic fogger  https://beekeepclub.com/treating-mites-with-an-oxalic-acid-fogger/

 

We Have Our Own Email:

YCBeekeepers@gmail.com

 

President: Steve McNeely

tstevemcneely@bellsouth.net

 

Newsletter: Estelle Prinsloo

estelleprinz@gmail.com

January 2020

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1RE8bZ523Tdyfl6hu4tsa4XRyfm9GG3AHM42BdCtWkDs/edit?usp=sharing_eil&ts=5e305ce8

What’s up in the hives this month?


Even less bee activity and cold weather will send the bees back into a cluster. On warm days watch for bees to fly out to make cleansing flights and forage for pollen. Keep the entrances just small enough for two bees to enter.

  • Attend bee meetings and bring a friend
  • Make sure equipment is stored properly to stop wax moth damage
  • Feed syrup when the temperature allows (45-50 degrees)
  • Talk to experienced beekeepers for winter preps
  • Pay state and local dues – Past Due ($20 state and $10 local)

 

Replace old or tired bee equipment – order from our own co-op, it’s economical and William will be happy to help you. It will help to get you through the dark, cold winter.  williamcopelandjr50@gmail.com

 

Meet William Copeland – Beekeeper Extraordinary


Today I had the  privilege of interviewing William Copeland Jr., our co-op manager, on his lovely farm in Chester SC and meeting his precious master gardener wife, Sherry, and their two precious grandchildren Bricksen and Palmer. William was born in Rock Hill, and was raised in Chester along with his 10 brothers and sisters.

William has two children: Laura who lives locally and James who lives in Kansas and seven grandchildren. Nine year old Bricksen loves to go into the hives with his proud granddaddy. 


A proud veteran, William served in the Air Force serving in 27 countries and 49 states. He served in the Gulf War and left the service when the government cut back on the number of troops. William then returned to South Carolina to help his mom and dad on their farm. His post service career included working in the Hazmat disposal area and in wastewater treatment.  

 

In 2000, a friend John Bagley, saw a newspaper article about keeping bees and William a keen gardener thought it would be amazing for his crops. And so his bee journey began.

 

William started to keep bees purely to pollinate his extensive vegetable gardens. He had no sponsor or mentor so he missed a lot of the finer details and almost gave up. William considers beekeeping his hobby and finds it really enjoyable and relaxing. It is hard at times because of the injuries to his ankles and feet incurred during a jump while in service and further complicated by a horrific wreck in 1995. 

 

Five years ago he helped to start the co-op. Initially all the board lent a hand but it became very complicated to maintain an inventory so William volunteered to run it. Currently he spends 8-10 hours a day for 2-3 weeks when getting in new inventory and on many days he even takes home inventory to pack it. He also mentors 5-6 people and one of his mentees lives 40 miles away.

 

Currently William has 11 hives and according to him a few “Ain’t doing so good”. He splits his hives and makes his own queens. He keeps Italians as he finds the Russians too aggressive. He has captured many swarms. He puts out swarm boxes, leaving the bottom empty and adding queen pheromones and lemongrass oil to lure the bees. 

 

Tips:

  • Become a beekeeper prepared to work-if you don’t work for it you won’t have success.
  • Share your knowledge
  • Ask questions/doubts whatever’s on your mind ask
  • Get a bee buddy.

 

Tricks: (things that work for William)

  • During winter lift the lid with popsicle sticks to increase airflow and reduce condensation
  • He is making a bee vacuum to capture swarms
  • Check your bees on a warm day, don’t touch bees below 50F
  • Don’t check bees everyday-this disturbs their natural rhythms and you run the risk of killing the queens.
  • William fogs his hives twice per year as needed for Varroa, he does an alcohol wash to test.
  • He also carries an epipen any time he works with his bees, you never know when you are going to be allergic.


Funny Story:

One time as he was cutting grass on his tractor he inadvertently blew the hives with the tractor exhaust – the girls did not like it at all and they came out in force. He jumped off his running tractor and keeping in mind that his mobility is impaired, walked away from the bees incurring 12 stings on his head, face and arms during his not so hasty exit. He had to walk all the way back home to get his bee suit and retrieve his tractor. 

 

Now:

William will have surgery on his other ankle on January 30th to repair 4 torn ligaments and bone spurs. This is the ankle that has had to carry him. We wish this incredible volunteer a speedy and safe recovery. On behalf of the club thanks for all that you do.

 

 

Our Christmas Party Was a Huge Success

Click on the link to view the pictures:  https://photos.app.goo.gl/QBRZhynGoxfVsvGR7

 

Bee School

Feb 20th – April 2nd. Please help spread the word and post the attached flyer wherever you can. The cost is $90 and includes all materials. YCBA2020Flyer

 

Bee Packages

Packages will Arrive April 11th and are $95 each. Queens are $25 and Marked Queens are $30. Get your orders in soon as packages are limited.

 

YCBA Meetings

2nd Thursdays of each month at 6:30 pm.  Bullock Creek Church, 1188 Edgefield Rd, York, SC 29745

James Alverson will be our January speaker.

 

We Have Our Own Email:

YCBeekeepers@gmail.com

 

President: Steve McNeely

tstevemcneely@bellsouth.net

 

Newsletter: Estelle Prinsloo

estelleprinz@gmail.com

November 2019

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1769V9QRXnXqDd_4dLZDVtxgxHqkxY1iJVvRUVywOpRQ/edit?usp=sharing_eil&ts=5dcc2c14

What’s up in the hives this month?

Even less bee activity and cold weather will send the bees back into a cluster. On warm days watch for bees to fly out to make cleansing flights and forage for pollen. Keep the entrances just small enough for two bees to enter.

  • Attend bee meetings and bring a friend
  • Make sure equipment is stored properly to stop wax moth damage
  • Feed syrup when the temperature allows (45-50 degrees)
  • Talk to experienced beekeepers for winter preps
  • On warm days bees will forage for pollen
  • Pay state and local dues, $20 YCBA and $10 State