When Bees Move In, Who Ya Gonna Call To Move ‘Em Out?

Swarm Removal List

These beekeepers are willing to relocate HONEY BEES ONLY from your property to an apiary so they can continue to benefit our farms and gardens with pollination. Swarms of honeybees appear most often in March-July. These bees are attempting to find a new home. A swarm represents free bees to beekeepers and anyone on the list below would be interested in capturing them. A swarm that is not captured will colonize lots of places that are inconvenient to humans.

 

Make sure you understand what the beekeeper is agreeing to do before work begins. Some beekeepers will remove honeybees from within walls of structures but they may charge a fee for this service and may not perform structural repairs. Swarms can pause for a few minutes to maybe 36 hours. Are you sure they are still there? How high up off the ground is it? Are you sure they are honeybees?

Swarm Removal List

Name

Phone

Locations

Certification

Name

Lisa Rushin
TheLadyBee@yahoo.com

Phone

803.524.5463
Anytime

Locations

Fort Mill, SC
And surrounding areas

Certification

Certified
No structure removals

Name

Bennie Copeland
BCopeland@comporium.net

Phone

803.984.0820
Anytime

Locations

Rock Hill, SC
20 Mile Radius

Certification

Certified
No structure removals

Name

Chuck Addison
ChuckAddison33@gmail.com

Phone

803.242.3097
Anytime

Locations

Rock Hill, SC
Lesslie, Catawba

Certification

Name

Hope Sadler
hope.sadler@bramespecialty.com

Phone

803.448.0548
Anytime

Locations

Rock Hill, SC
20 mile radius

Certification

No structures

Name

Jonathan Boan
boanjonathan@yahoo.com

Phone

803.370.4594
Evenings & weekends

Locations

Rock Hill, SC

Certification

Certified

Name

Ronald Fletcher
ronaldfletcher1990@gmail.com

Phone

803.487.2661
Any day

Locations

Rock Hill, SC
20 Mile Radius

Certification

Journeyman
Swarms < 15 ft, On-site structure inspect. for a fee

Name

Thomas Ligon
tligon@comporium.net

Phone

803.230.3638
Any time

Locations

Rock Hill, SC
25 Mile Radius

Certification

-
Structure Removals

Name

Warren Hill
warrenhill01@gmail.com

Phone

910.476.7356
Afternoon & weekends

Locations

Rock Hill, SC

Certification

Name

Dave Milbourne
dbmilbourne@aol.com

Phone

803.554.3022

Locations

Sharon, SC

Certification

Specializes in structure removals

Name

Jennifer Stalford
jstalford@comporium.net

Phone

803.493.4020
Daytime

Locations

Tega Cay, SC
Clover, FM, RH, Indian Land

Certification

Certified
No structure removals

Name

Aaron Hughes
aaron.hughes@att.net

Phone

803.810.3101
Almost anytime

Locations

York, SC
50 Mile Radius

Certification

Certified
Structure removals

Name

Jackie Kirkland
kirklandb@comporium.net

Phone

803.984.2363

Locations

York, SC

Certification

Certified

Name

Ken Milem
kenmilem@gmail.com

Phone

864.505.7369
Anytime

Locations

York, SC

Certification

Certified
Structure Removals

Name

Michael Sandifer
msandif@g.clemson.edu

Phone

803.493.2238
Anytime

Locations

York, SC
and surrounding areas

Certification

Certified
Will assist in structure removals

How to Catch a Bee Swarm

Swarms sometimes land on a tree or shrub about head high where they are relatively easy to catch. If they are higher and you need a ladder be extremely cautious. As long as you can safely access them the process of collecting them is essentially the same.

Find a container

  • This is almost always done in a hurry so you may want to put some gear together so you can grab and go. Some ideas include: an empty beehive, cardboard box, plastic tote or bucket. It has to have a lid and ventilation. Improvise. Cut holes in the container or staple screen material over the top to keep the bees inside during transport.

Suit up and get ready!

  • Wear a bee suit in case the bees get agitated
  • Bee brush to sweep them into the box, though a soft-bristle brush works in a pinch
  • An old bed sheet to lay on the ground directly under the swarm to catch the bees that don’t initially make it into the box. If needed, weights to hold down the edges of the sheet if it’s windy

Dislodge the bees

  • Hold the container directly under the swarm and give a strong shake to dislodge most of the bees into the box. Quickly sweep the remaining bees into the box before setting the box on the sheet directly below the location of the swarm. Shaking works well for branches but for fixed objects like a wall or telephone pole sweeping is the only option to dislodge the bees.

Stand back and observe

  • You won’t get all the bees into the box with the initial shaking and sweeping but as long as the queen is in the box the remaining bees will soon follow. If the queen is not in the box the bees climb out and return to her. Just wait for them to reform into a single mass and then repeat the process.

Wait for the stragglers

  • If you have the time, leave the box until dusk so that the scout bees will join the group as they return throughout the day. To encourage the bees to stay put it’s best to put the lid on the box while you wait, leaving it open just a tad to admit the stragglers. But if you’re in a hurry, go ahead and brush any bees from the sheet into the box and head home with your bees.

Set up the new hive

  • Close the box leaving the ventilation holes open and transfer the bees into their new hive within 24 hours.